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Identify alternate names or variations of each ethical system based on your reading of the text and supplemental materials.

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  • Post Date 2018-11-08T09:19:55+00:00
  • Post Category New Samples

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Identify alternate names or variations of each ethical system based on your reading of the text and supplemental materials.

Ethical Systems Table

INSTRUCTIONS:
  • Fill in brief definitions of each primary ethical theory. 

  • Identify alternate names or variations of each ethical system based on your reading of the text and supplemental materials.

  • Match the real-world examples listed below with the corresponding systems. The first one has been completed for you in the table.

 

Real-World Examples

 

A. I believe people should be able to eat sand if they like the taste of it.

 

B. I believe that if sand is going to be eaten, it should be available for everyone to eat.

 

C. I believe people should be able to eat sand because it is the right thing to do.

 

D. I believe people should be able to eat sand because it is good for one’s health.

 

E. I believe people should be able to eat sand if they decide they want to, regardless of whether it is someone else’s sand.

 

F. I believe people should be able to eat sand if they want to because they are free to make the decision themselves.

 

G. I believe I will eat sand because it is the standard meal for my community.

 

  • Develop your own workplace example that fits with each system. Present each workplace scenario in a substantial paragraph of approximately 40 words. Although the table field will expand to accommodate your workplace examples, you may list them at the end of the table; make a note in the table to see the attached examples, however, so your facilitator knows to look for scenarios below the table. 
CONTENT:

University of Phoenix Material                        Ethical Systems Table Theory/System and Brief DefinitionOther NamesReal-World ExampleWorkplace ExampleDuty-based ethicsRegardless of consequences, certain moral principles are binding, focusing on duty rather than results or moral obligation over what the individual would prefer to do (Treviño & Nelson, 2011, Ch. 2).In ethics, deontological ethics, or deontology (Greek: deon meaning obligation or duty), is a theory holding that decisions should be made solely or primarily by considering one`s duties and the rights of others. Some systems are based on biblical or tenets from

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