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1. Apply theories & research evidence to social work practice, whilst taking into account rights, justice & economic wellbeing aff

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  • Post Date 2018-11-09T09:59:19+00:00
  • Post Category Assignment

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1. Apply theories & research evidence to social work practice, whilst taking into account rights, justice & economic wellbeing affecting individuals and/or groups.

Following on from the GROUP PRESENTATION/ROLE PLAY PANEL DISCUSSION, students will submit a 2,500-word critical reflection which will be marked by academic staff and which holds the academic grade for this module.  Both tasks must be undertaken in order to meet the learning outcomes.

Task One:  Critically reflect on the case study chosen by your Action Learning Set (ALS).  You should demonstrate critical exploration of the complexities of contemporary social work practice and professional decision making, including analysis of the impact of values, ethics and diversity (1,500 words).  (Learning outcomes 4, 5 & 8)

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Task Two: Critically reflect on your own learning & development in relation to collaborative working in health & social care, drawing on your experience of group working in this module and referring to relevant research & literature. Identify future learning needs and how you might address these (1,000 words). (Learning outcomes 6, 7 & 8)

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  1. Apply theories & research evidence to social work practice, whilst taking into account rights, justice & economic wellbeing affecting individuals and/or groups.
  2. Critically reflect upon service users’ and carers’ perspectives, involvement & participation in social work practice, and the implications for their own professional practice.
  3. Demonstrate a critical understanding of key processes & professional skills relevant for social work.

 

  1. 4.    Apply critical reflection and analysis to consider the complex interplay of variables that shape the social work role and task, and provide a rationale for professional decision making.

 

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  1. 5.    Critically explore and apply the values, ethics & diversity underpinning professional social work practice.

 

  1. 6.    Demonstrate an ability to engage with, and reflect on, changing contexts that shape practice, including effective partnership working.

 

 

  1. 7.    Demonstrate development of professional behaviour, particularly in terms of critical reflection on the impact of self in interaction with others, and on identification of /addressing own learning & development.

 

  1. 8.    Demonstrate professional written skills for social work practice.

 

PLEASE NOTE that in my group I was the moderator of our panel (5 members including me). I introduced our case study and lead our panel throughout the discussion by asking each person some questions on the particular area assigned to them to cover. each has 4mins. maximum to respond to the question asked. total of 20mins. for the whole discussion/role panel play and 10mins. to answer questions from the audience. 

 

Appendix 1: 

THE CASE STUDY CHOSEN BY OUR ACTION LEARNING SET (ALS) FOR THE GROUP PRESENTATION/PANEL DISCUSSION AND ROLE PLAY. (CASE NO. 37)

 

Practice Panel: a man with diabetes and stroke presents a tough case

February 7, 2007 in Children, Disability, Mental Health

A man of 38 slipped into depression after a series of traumatic experiences, including paralysis from a stroke. Our panel advises

Case Study
The name of the service user has been changed

SITUATION: Alfie Thomas is 38. For most of his adult life he was earning good money as a self-employed heating engineer and had a lavish lifestyle. This changed in 2005 when his wife of 10 years filed for divorce. She was his life. He spent the next year living in rented accommodation, gambling, smoking and drinking heavily. Last year he suffered a massive stroke leaving him paralysed down his left side. He became diabetic and lost all sense in his mouth. He has regular fits. With no family or friends to help, he moved into supported accommodation.

PROBLEM: Once very active, Alfie is now lethargic and depressed. He stares at the floor avoiding eye contact. He is occasionally irritable and prone to verbal outbursts but is mostly quiet. He is reluctant to go out saying that he has no life. He is petrified of having a fit in public and thinks at best he will be ridiculed, at worst left to die. “I don’t even know what happens when I fit – nobody tells me anything,” he has said. He feels that he invested all his love into his wife and was rejected. He had a life and money then. Now, he feels he has nothing and cannot make relationships. He refuses to attend a day service. He can’t taste food so has little interest in it. He drinks 10 to 20 cups of coffee, smokes 40 cigarettes and drinks half a bottle of whisky a day. He is also on Warfarin and Epilem.

This article appeared in the 8 February issue of the magazine, under the headline “Suddenly he had nothing”

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CASE STUDY/GROUP PRESENTATION GUIDANCE

 

You are required to work in groups of approximately 6 people, and to agree time to work on the case study when other teaching is not being run.  Time will be allocated on Wednesday 14th December 2016 for ALS to deliver a short presentation offering feedback on the studies.

The aim of this activity is to enable you to integrate the learning across the programme and to demonstrate how a range of knowledge informs your social work practiceYou are not required to ‘solve’ the problem, but rather to consider the various factors which would influence your understanding of the problems and your style and approach to intervention.  You can elaborate on the case studies in whatever way you think is appropriate, but please try to remain as realistic as possible in terms of resources.

You will clearly draw on other resources which will relate directly to the case study.  It would be a good idea to spend time dividing the tasks between the members of the ALS and meeting regularly to check out progress.  Each ALS will be required to present their findings to the rest of the ALS tutorial group. Each ALS will have a 30-minute slot for a presentation lasting no more than 20 minutes and 10 minutes for questions. You are also required to provide a folder which supports the presentation; this must include a bibliography.

 

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The following is a checklist of some of the things you need to consider – there are others:

  • Social Policy
  • Law
  • Sociology
  • Regulatory frameworks and organisational structures
  • Theories of practice
  • Use of relationships
  • National Occupational Standards – key roles
  • Power
  • Advocacy
  • Risk and risk assessment
  • Identity/ethnicity
  • Values and influence on practice
  • Theories of human behaviour
  • Research findings
  • Resources and accessibility
  • Service user/carer perspectives
  • Multi-agency/multi-professional working
  • Professionalism
  • Ethics of practice

 

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Please, this link is very important and we are recommended to source some of our information from this link/website.

 

Knowledge base (PCF)

Transferable knowledge

Participation

Professional Identity

Inter-professional and inter-agency collaboration (IPIAC)

Key policy and legislation with implications for inter-professional and inter-agency collaboration (Reforms, what the implication might be for me as a practitioner both Nationally and locally such as local authority)

Professional identity and collaboration

Building relationships, establishing trust and negotiating with other workers

Working together to assess needs, strengths and risks

A model of practice and collaboration

Working collaboratively in different types of teams

The practitioner, the agency and inter-agency collaboration

 

For example, Exploring the principles of Bruce W. Tuckman (1965) theory of group work dynamics, practice and development of working with groups.

Integrating the knowledge, values and skills, developing a critical awareness of current issues within social work practice.  Students will learn about and apply ethical principles and legislation.  The module will contribute to students’ ability to achieve standards of proficiency and conduct, performance and ethics as required for professional registration with HCPC.  The module will contribute to students’ ability to achieve The College of Social Work Professional Capabilities Framework standards at “qualifying level”.

Recognising Collaborative working as a central function of Social Work practice and thus a role that practitioners are required to assume routinely.  Thus, social work practitioners can be equated to actors in collaborative working, shaping process & outcomes, and being shaped by the process.

  • For these reasons, we should understand our own contributions and responses to process.
  • Reflecting on ALS experience offers potential for mining a rich seam of learning about:
  • The complexities of interpersonal working (which underpin much collaborative working)
  • The often invisible but time-consuming practical/logistical minutiae of much of professional life
  • The critical importance of personal/professional responsibility
  • Your own strengths/weaknesses at this stage (current potential) for effective collaborative working
  • Action planning to develop your skills/aptitude for effective collaborative working in future (enhancing potential)

Reflecting on learning & development needs also fits into the requirements for registered social workers to identify and maintain areas for continuing professional development in line with The College of Social Work Professional Capabilities Framework and the HCPC Standards of Proficiency and Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics.

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  • Understanding of HCPC Standards of Proficiency
  • Understanding of TCSW Professional Capabilities Framework at “qualifying level”
  • Working within specialist areas of Adults services, for example, asylum seekers and refugees; dementia and end of life care; substance misuse; physical ill health, disability and learning disability
  • Working within specialist areas of Mental Health services, for example, dual diagnosis; forensic social work; parental mental health problems
  • Critical themes & debates relevant to social work role and tasks, including:
  • Application of legislation & policy for complex areas of practice within Adults & Children’s Services, including administrative law
  • Critical perspectives on service users’ and carers’ experiences and expectations of social work practice.
  • Critical analysis of key processes – assessment, intervention and review within Adults and Children’s Services
  • Critical application of social work theories and the evidence base for practice.
  • Critical application of values and ethics and understanding of the complexities these present in practice.
  • Critical understanding of advanced professional skills for practice – risk assessment & management, prevention of harm, managing conflict, complex communication skills, report writing etc.
  • Critical awareness of the nature & importance of professional leadership, including the effective use of supervision and responsibility for learning and development.
  • Critical reflection on the nature of professionalism within social work practice.

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In their Action Learning Sets students will work on producing a 20-30-minute group presentation/role play panel discussion, focusing on a social work focused case study; they will be required to demonstrate critical awareness of theories, research, processes and professional skills relevant to that area of social work processes, and to reflect on service user/carer perspectives & involvement and the impact of these on their practice.  The presentation will be assessed by a member of the module teaching team and will be graded pass/fail.

 

Students will also need to produce a written assignment following on from the group presentation/role play panel discussion, which reflects on and explores issues including values, ethics & diversity and the complexities of professional social work practice and decision making.  This coursework will also be expected to include reflection on the collaborative working process and the student’s own learning & development.  Coursework will be marked by academic staff.

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Some relevant skills are-:

  • Assertiveness skills - being able to challenge and confront issues of concern
  • Creating a rapport and establishing a relationship
  • Social pedagogy
  • Empowerment and enabling skills
  • Managing professional boundaries
  • Offering encouragement and validation
  • Person centred counselling skills- communication skills eg open questions and Unconditional Positive - Carl Rogers
  • Knowledge of local resources
  • Knowledge people of Human rights.
  • Knowledge of Mental Health Act and Care Act, Housing legislation.
  • Recognition of risk – positive risk taking, but also when decision making puts service at risk of harm or others at risk of harm.
  • Look at PCFs
  • Providing information
  • Providing practical and emotional support
  • Record keeping skills
  • Reflective practice
  • Using supervision creatively
  • Working in partnership with AS

(Trevithick, 2012).

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Some Theories that could be considered

  • Theories of practise – loss and grief, Maslow balance of needs, Erickson human development theory, collaborative practise
  • Loss and grief because he loss is love and job
  • Erikson, Maslow, development theories
  • Medical and Social model theories
  • Relationship building
  • Person Centred Approach (including Unconditional Positive Regard by Carl Rogers)
  • Communication
  • Collaboration with other agencies and professionals

 

ü  Loss and grief (She was his life)

ü  Medical model (Once very active, Alfie is now lethargic and depressed. He stares at the floor avoiding eye contact. He is occasionally irritable and prone to verbal outbursts but is mostly quiet) (He is also on Warfarin and Epilem)

ü  Social model (He has regular fits. With no family or friends to help) (He is reluctant to go out saying that he has no life. He is petrified of having a fit in public and thinks at best he will be ridiculed, at worst left to die. “I don’t even know what happens when I fit – nobody tells me anything,” he has said. He feels that he invested all his love into his wife and was rejected. He had a life and money then. Now, he feels he has nothing and cannot make relationships. He refuses to attend a day service. He can’t taste food so has little interest in it. He drinks 10 to 20 cups of coffee, smokes 40 cigarettes and drinks half a bottle of whisky a day.)


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