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2016-17 ED4006 Philosophy Of Education

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2016-17 ED4006 Philosophy Of Education

 

CASS SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND COMMUNITIE 

 

Module Title: Philosophy of Education

Module Code: ED4006

 

 

Level 4

Semesters A & B

Academic Year 2016/17

 

ED4006 Philosophy of Education

 

 

MODULE GUIDE

 

 

Semester A and B 2016/17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Timetabled Teaching

 

This is an overview for your calendar. Please refer to the Teaching Schedule (pp.11-15) and to Moodle, for required reading, specific seminar tasks and Moodle discussion topics.

 

DAYS and DATES

ACTIVITY

TIMES

ROOMS

Week 1

 

04/10/16

Lecture

Introduction to the Module

 

Seminar

 

Question: Based on the lecture and readings, what do you think philosophy is? Please refer to the Study Schedule p.11 for details of reading. Keeping your Learning Log.

 

Moodle: Introductions – post a brief introduction to the rest of the group.  Think about your reasons for entering higher education.

 

 

11:00am-12:30pm

 

 

 

 

12:30-2:00pm

UH2.01

 

 

Seminar:

Group 1: CC1.18

 

Group 2:

RBG.14

 

Group 3:

UH3.04

 

Week 2

 

11/10/16

Lecture

Exploring  Philosophy of Education

 

Seminar

Refer to teaching schedule on p 12

 

Moodle: Please refer to the Study Schedule pp. 11-15 and to the ED4006 Moodle page for Moodle discussions.

 

 

 

Week 3

 

18/10/16

Lecture

Academic Writing

Plagiarism and derivative work

Seminar

Read Pears and Shields (2010)

 

 

 

 

Week 4

 

25/10/16

Lecture 4

Enlightenment philosophy 

 

Seminar

Preparation for Assignment 1: Report on trip to British Library

 

Formative Assessment 1

Submit  formative assessment to Turnitin: Weeks 1-3 of learning log

 

 

 

 

 

Week 5

 

01/11/15

Lecture

John Dewey & Pragmatism

 

Seminar

Refer to teaching schedule on p 12

 

 

 

Week 6

 

08/11/16

 

Study Boost Week

Independent Study Skills tasks, communication with seminar tutors about Learning Log and Assignment 1.

 

Moodle

Study skills activities:- academic integrity and referencing

 

 

 

 

Week 7

 

15/11/16

Lecture

No lecture

Trip to British Library for workshop: Research Matters

 

Seminar

No seminar. Please read: Barthes, R. (1968) The Death of the Author. Available on Moodle Week 6

 

 

 

 

Week 8

 

22/11/16

Lecture

Introducing Analytic philosophy

Seminar

 

Refer to the Teaching Schedule p.12 and to Moodle

 

Formative Assessment 2

Submit formative assessment to Turnitin: Weeks 5-8 of learning log.

 

 

 

 

Week 9

 

29/11/16

 

 

Lecture

Introducing Existentialism      

 

Seminar  task:

Refer to Teaching schedule on p 14 below

  

 

 

Week 10

 

06/11/16

Lecture

Introduction to Critical Theory

 

Seminar Tasks

 Refer to Teaching Schedule on p 14

 

 

 

Week 11

 

13/12/16

Lecture

The Hermeneutic tradition  & Introducing Assignment 2

 

Seminar tasks

Refer to the Teaching Schedule p.13 and to Moodle. Support for assignment planning and completing Personal Learning Log 

 

 

 

 

Week 12

 

10/01/16

 Lecture

Introducing Constructivism

 

Seminar task

Refer to the Teaching Schedule p.14 and to Moodle.

 

 

 

 

17/01/17

Feedback week

 

 

Week 13 (1)

 

24/01/17

 Lecture

Postmodernism & Post-structuralism

 

Seminar task

Refer to Teaching Schedule p.16 and to Moodle

 

 

 

Week14 (2)

 

31/01/17

Lecture

Truth, Knowledge and Epistemology

 

Seminar task

Refer to Teaching Schedule p.16 and to Moodle

 

 

Week

15 (3)

 

07/02/17

Lecture

Activities and Advice for Assignment 2: Reflective Essay and Part 2 of the Learning Log

 

Seminar task

Paired peer review of Learning Log entries, essay structure activities

 

 

 

Week

16 (4)

 

14/02/17

Lecture

Non-foundational Theories of Knowledge

 

Seminar Task:

Refer to Teaching Schedule p.16 and to Moodle

 

 

 

Week

17 (5)

 

21/02/17

 

 

Lecture

Research in Education

 

Seminar Task:

 

Refer to the Teaching Schedule p.16 and to Moodle.

 

 

 

 

Week 18 (6)

 

28/02/17

 

Study Boost Week  - No Lecture 

 

Activities

Develop Assignment 2: Discuss Learning Log with seminar tutor. Research and planning for the reflective essay. Correspond with tutor for formative assessment

 

 

 

 

Week

19 (7)

 

5/03/16

Attendance on Trip, no Lecture.

Trip to the British Museum: Multicultural Education and Cultural Relativism

 

Task:

Refer to the Teaching Schedule p.16 and to Moodle.

 

 

 

 

Week

20 (8)

 

14/03/16

Lecture

Professionalism Ethics & Assignment Discussion

 

Seminar Task:

Refer to the Teaching Schedule p.16 and to Moodle.

 

 

 

 

Week

21(9)

 

21/03/16

Lecture

Reflections on progress: What is the use of philosophy in education?

 

Seminar Tasks:

Refer to the Teaching Schedule p.16 and to Moodle.

 

 

 

 

Week

22 (10)

 

28/03/16

Lecture

Learning Log & Essay – Study Issues and Q&A

 

Seminar

Individual support

 

 

 

 

Week

23 (11)

 

04/04/16

Lecture

No lecture

 

Seminar

Individual support

 

 

 

Week 24

24/04/17

Lecture

No lecture

 

Seminar

Individual support

 

 

Study fest

 

30/04/17

 

Revision classes and study skills sessions

 

 

 

 

How to access your timetable

To access your personal timetable log into the intranet and click on the timetable box and save to your favourite browser, or use the intranet link (UEL ID required to login)

https://uelac.sharepoint.com/students/Pages/Timetable-and-Attendance.aspx

 

All room numbers on our campuses follow the same pattern – the initial of the building, followed by the floor number and finally the room number e.g. DL4.01 is room 1 on the 4th floor of the Dockland Library building. Campus maps can be found on https://www.uel.ac.uk/About/Finding-us

 

Initials

Building name

Campus

AE

Arthur Edwards

Stratford

AVA

AVA Building

Docklands

DL

Docklands Library

Docklands

CC

Conference and Computer Centre

Stratford

EB

East Building

Docklands

ED

School of Cass Education and Communities

Stratford

ITC

IT clusters - Library

Docklands

KD

Knowledge Dock

Docklands

LT

Lecture Theatre

Stratford

MLT

Main Lecture Theatre

Docklands

RB

R Building

Stratford

SD

Sports Dock

Docklands

UH

University House

Stratford

US

University Square Stratford

University Square Stratford

WB

West Building

Docklands

 

 

 

 

Assessment Hand-in Due Dates

 

Assignment 1

 

 Report on visit to the British Library

 

 Tuesday 13th December 2016 before 3:00pm

 

 

NB. The Learning Log needs to be handed in for formative

Assessment in Week 5 – by 1st November 2016 by 3pm

 

Assignment 2

 

Learning Log

 

Essay Question

Tuesday 2nd May  2017 before 3:00pm

Tuesday 2nd May 2017

before 3:00 pm

 

 

 


introduction to the MODULE                                                                      

 

School of Education: Undergraduate Programmes

 

 

This Module Guide formalises the requirements of you and your tutors for effective learning to take place during your studies here.

 

1. It details the nature and demands of the module,

    including:

 

  • a week-by-week list of topics to be covered by the module;
  • a description of the assessment criteria to be used during the module;
  • a statement of the nature, pattern and timing of the assessment;
  • the dates and times by which all assignments must be submitted and details of the process for doing this.

 

 

2. A register will be kept of attendance, and submission and return of all assignments for all modules.

 

3. Students are expected to:

 

  • participate fully in the learning process especially during class time;
  • attend all classes and arranged tutorials;
  • switch off mobiles in class;
  • provide explanations of enforced absences;
  • hand all assignments in on time following published procedures;
  • attend all examinations at the published time and venue;
  • complete 300 hours of study (including assessed work and time-tabled activities) for each 30-credit module;
  • regularly check their communication channels (e.g. Outlook  emails and notice-boards);
  • keep their records with the School up to date.

 

 

Important facts regarding this module

 

This module is a core module for BA (Hons.) Education Studies

 

 

MODULE AIMS

 

Philosophy of Education is an important field of study in its own right. It is central to the subject of Education Studies and asks fundamental questions which affect us all, whether we are students, teachers, policy-makers, employers or parents. This course offers the chance to explore key questions in education. It explores the history and philosophy of education to provide students with an understanding of the themes which underpin current educational thinking.

 

This course challenges students to make sense of the world we live in and encourages them to think in logical and consistent ways. The practical and theoretical knowledge gained by students will help them to become effective practitioners in any employment that demands an understanding of critical and logical processes and the implications for the individual.

 

 

MODULE LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

At the end of this Module, students will be able to:

 

Knowledge:

1. Apply a range of theoretical perspectives in relation to educational philosophy

2. Identify and evaluate key philosophical issues in education

Thinking Skills:

3. Describe and analyse different and competing philosophical theories of education

Subject-based practical skills:

4. Apply philosophy to an analysis of a variety of educational issues such as justice, equality, autonomy and meritocracy.

5. Use academic texts to inform thinking and practice.

6. Demonstrate skills of information retrieval, handling and presentation in accordance with academic convention.

7. Demonstrate knowledge of different concepts of professionalism in the context of education

 

 

 

 

READING AND RESOURCES LIST

 

Essential Reading for this Module:

 

 

Curtiss, W .Sharp, J. Ward, S and Hankin, L. (eds) 3nd ed (2014) Education

   Studies: An Issues Based Approach, Exeter: Learning Matters  Publication.

 

Boronski, T. and Hassan, N. (eds) (2011) Reader in

   Education Studies, London: Sage.

 

Boronski, T. and Hassan, N. (2015) Sociology of Education, London: Sage

 

Noddings, N. (2015) Philosophy of Education (4th edn), 

   Boulder, Co: Westview Press.

 

 

 Reading for this Module:

 

Alexander, R. (ed) (2009) Children, their World, their Education:

   Final report and recommendations of the Cambridge Primary

   Review London: Routledge.

 

Barrow, R. and Woods, R.  (2006) 4th edn. An Introduction to

   Philosophy of Education, Abingdon: Routledge.

 

Bartlett, S. and Burton, D. (2016) An Introduction to Education

  Studies, (4th edn) London: Sage.

 

Bartlett,S. (2003) Education Studies: Essential Issues, London: 

   Paul Chapman.

 

Bailey, R. (2010) Philosophy of Education: An Introduction, London: Continuum.

 

De Botton, A. (2001) The Consolations of Philosophy, London: Penguin.

 

Carr, W. (2005) The Routledge Falmer Reader in Philosophy of  

   Education, London: Routledge.

 

Dewey, J. (1916) Democracy and Education, New York: Free Press.

 

Freire, P. (1996) Pedagogy of the Oppressed, London: 

   Penguin.

 

Illich, I. (1970) Deschooling Society, London: Marion Boyars.

 

Kassem, D. Mufti, E. and Robinson, J. (eds) (2006) Education

   Studies: Issues and Critical Perspectives, Milton Keynes:

   Open University Press.

 

Moore, R. (2004) Education and Society: issues and

   Explanations in the Sociology of Education, London: Polity.

 

Palmer, J. A. (2001) Fifty Modern Thinkers in Education: From

  Piaget to the Present London: Routledge.

 

Plato (2007) The Republic (Translated by Desmond Lee and an Introduction by

  Melissa Lane) London: Penguin.

 

Pritchard, A. (2008) Ways of Learning: Learning Theories and

   Learning Styles in the Classroom, London: David Fulton.

 

Rousseau, J. J. (2009) [1762] Emile (Translated by Barbara Foxley) Las Vegas, Nevada: IAP.

 

Russell, B. (1945) The History of Western Philosophy, New York: Simon and Schuster.

 

Usher, R. and Edwards, R. (1994) Postmodernism and Education: Different Voices, Different Worlds, London: Routledge.

 

Ward, S (2004) Education Studies: A Student’s Guide,

   New York: Routledge Falmer.

 

 

Walkup, V. (ed) (2012) Exploring Education Studies, London: Longman.

 

 

For referencing

 

Pears, R. and Shields, G. (2010) Cite Them Right: The

   essential referencing guide, London: Palgrave.

 

For information collecting skills 

 

Richardson, L. and McBryde-Wilding (2009) Information Skills for Education Students, Exeter: Learning Matters.

 

Journals

 

British Educational Research Journal   Routledge

 

Websites

 

www.educationotherwise.com

www.education.guardian.co.uk

www.irr.org.uk

 

Wider Reading:

 

As an undergraduate student you should be reading widely on educational issues and developing a sound knowledge and understanding of theoretical and policy developments.  Any books on the wider issues of education will help in your understanding of the themes explored in this module. In addition you should endeavour to reads quality newspapers such as The Times, The Guardian, The Daily Telegraph, The Observer and The Independent on a regular basis. Familiarise yourself with the Education Library and search for topics which we will cover. 

 

For those of you wishing to read a simple introduction to philosophy, I would recommend Alain De Botton`s The Consolations of Philosophy 

 

Do not rely on the Library as your only source.  Become a competent user of Athens and reap the benefits of e-journals.

 

Do not forget to access Moodle regularly- at least 3 times a week. You should find your module guide, lecture materials, reading, web links, notices and tasks to complete.

 

When you log on to UEL Direct, click on the Moodle tab to see all the sites relevant to your studies, including the Student Guide site, containing videos, screenshots and information about how to use Moodle and its tools. If you cannot see the module sites in Moodle, then check with the Hub if your information is correct in DELTA, the student database

 

 

TEACHING SCHEDULE

 

This section gives a more detailed view of your learning content and the tasks you will be asked to carry out.

 

Week

Lecture Focus/Tasks

 Seminar Tasks & Moodle Discussion

 

1

Introduction to the Module

Expectations/weekly reading

What is philosophy? How to think like a philosopher.  How to extend your knowledge by reading.

 

Keeping your Personal Learning Log

For seminar 1 you will need to read:

Lecture 1 notes

 

Moodle: Introductions – post a brief introduction to the rest of the group.  Think about your reasons for entering higher education.

 

 

 

2

Lecture 2: Exploring  Philosophy of Education

 

 

Read

To prepare for Lecture & Seminar 2 you will need to read:   

Noddings (2015) p7 and pp9-16 Kortext

http://research-srttu.wikispaces.com/file/view/Nel+Noddings+Philosophy+of+Education+Dimensions+of+Personality++1995.pdf

 

Boronski and Hassan (2015) chapter 1. (pp8-16) and chapter 2 (pp23-27)

  

Questions:

1. Based on what you have learnt from the lecture and readings, what do you think philosophy is?

2. What did Socrates, Plato and Aristotle say is the purpose of education? Why should we be cautious when we read Socrates’s philosophy?

3. What is the Socratic Method?

4. Is it appropriate for schools?

 

Further reading: See questions on p21 of Noddings (2015)

Verharen (2002) in Boronski, T. and Hassan, N. (eds) (2011) Reader in Education Studies, London: Sage pp 222-245. Available on Moodle

 

Moodle: See Week 2 Quiz

 

Do glossary quiz: https://moodle.uel.ac.uk/mod/quiz/view.php?id=512486

 

 

 

 

3

Lecture 3

Academic Writing

Plagiarism and derivative work

 

 

 

 

Moodle

Read study skills presentations

Read

Pears and Shields (2010) pp 1-12.

  1. What is plagiarism?
  2. What do we mean by using ‘your voice’?
  3. What is the difference between summarising and synthesising?

 

 

4

Lecture 4:

Enlightenment philosophy 

Locke, Hobbes and Rousseau

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read

Noddings (2015:13-19)

 

Moodle: discussion 

Questions:

1. How has Rousseau influenced our attitudes to children and how to educate them?

2. Do you think children are born naturally good, naturally bad, or neither.

 

Formative Assessment 1

Submit formative assessment to Turnitin: Weeks 1-3 of learning log.

 

Preparation for Assignment 1: Report on trip to British Library on the 15th November

 

 

5

Lecture 5:

John Dewey:

  • Dialectic
  • Naturalism
  • Pragmatism
  • Education as growth
  • Child-centred learning
  • Theory of knowledge
  • Dewey’s psychology
  • Dewey on democracy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read

Noddings (2015: 23-32)

Questions 1-6 pp 32-32

 

Further reading: See p42 of Noddings. 

 

Moodle

What are the benefits of considering education as learning through experience?

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

Study Boost Week

 

Lecture

No lecture

Independent Study Skills tasks, communication with seminar tutors about Learning Log and Assignment 1.

 

Moodle

Study skills activities:- academic integrity and referencing

 

 

 

 

 

7

 Trip to British Library:

 ****This trip will be the basis of Assignment 1, so it is essential that you attend****

Lecture

No lecture

Trip to British Library for workshop: Research Matters

Morning session 10:45am – 12:15pm

Afternoon session 1:00pm- 2:30pm

 

 

Seminar

No seminar.

Reading for the workshop: Barthes, R. (1968) The Death of the Author. Available on Moodle Week 6

  • What to you owe the author when you read her/his/their text?
  • Is there only one way to read a text?
  • How important are authors’ drafts?

 

What did you learn from the trip to the British Library which might help your reading and research for your studies?

 

 

 

8

 

Lecture 8:

Introducing Analytic Philosophy 

 

 

 Analytic Philosophy

 

Noddings (2015: pp34-43),

Boronski and Hassan (2015) Ch1 pp.10-12

 

Moodle

 

Post your response to these questions:

 

1)     What are the key functions of a philosophy of education according to Analytic Philosophy?

2)     Why is it difficult to think of ‘objective’ or ‘value free’ philosophy?

 

Formative Assessment 2

Submit formative assessment to Turnitin: Weeks 5-8 of learning log.

 

 

9

Lecture 9:

Introduction to  Existentialism

 

Seminar:

 

Listen to Simone de Beauvoir`s Existentialist view of feminine beauty: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02b95yv

 

Read

Noddings (2015: pp 44-48)

 

Further reading: Noddings (2015: pp.56) Qus. 1-5

 

 

10

Lecture 10:

Introducing Critical Theory

Read

Noddings (2015:50-52)

Questions 7-11 p 55

 

(http://research-srttu.wikispaces.com/file/view/Nel+Noddings+Philosophy+of+Education+Dimensions+of+Personality++1995.pdf pp 50-52)

Questions 7-11 p83

 

 

11

Lecture 11

Introducing Hermeneutics

 

 

Seminar

Noddings (2015) pp52-53

1. Is the purpose of Hermeneutics to establish absolute truth?

2. What does Rorty mean by the `Hermeneutic Circle`?

3. How does Hermeneutics differ from Analytic Philosophy?

 

Further reading: Boronski and Hassan (2015) Ch 3. pp.54-55

 

 

 

 

12

Lecture 12

Constructivism, learning and knowledge

 

 

 

 

Read:

Noddings (2015) Section on Constructivism pp81-84. Questions 11- 16 at end of the Chapter p 84.

 

Moodle: Review your experience of ED4006 so far. See Learning Log template section after Week12

 

13

 

 

 

Lecture 13:

Postmodernism

Strategies for progression

 

Read

Noddings (2015: 53-55) questions 13-18 at end of Ch 4

 

(http://research-srttu.wikispaces.com/file/view/Nel+Noddings+Philosophy+of+Education+Dimensions+of+Personality++1995.pdf (section on postmodernism)

 

Read: Boronski and Hassan (2015) Ch. 3

 

Further reading:

Usher, R. and Edwards, R. (1994) Postmodernism and Education: Different Voices, Different Worlds,

London: Routledge.

 

 

 

14

Lecture 14:

Epistemology and Education

 Read:

Noddings (2015) Chapter 6 –Sections on Epistemology, Justified True Belief and Foundationalism. Questions 1-4 at the end of Chapter 6.

 

 

15

Lecture 15

Activities and Advice for Assignment 2: Reflective Essay and Part 2 of the Learning Log

 

Read and research around the essay question

 

16

Lecture 16

Non-foundational Theories of Knowledge

 

 

 

 

 Read:

Noddings (2015) Ch 6 – Section on Nonfoundational Knowledge. Questions 5-10

 

 

 

17

Lecture 18

The Debates about Educational Research

 

 

 

 Read:

Noddings (2012) Section on ‘A Debate in Education Research’ Ch 7 Qus 12-18

 

18

Lecture 17

Study Boost week

 

Read:

Noddings (2012) Section on ‘A Debate in Education Research’ Ch 7 Qus 12-18

Discuss learning logs with tutors in Learning Log. Read and research for Assignment 2

 

19

No Lecture

Trip to the British Museum: Finding the philosophers, Multicultural education & cultural relativism

  

 

 

Activity: Search for the philosopher

20

Lecture 20

Professionalism, Ethics and Education

Read:

Wilkins (1996) `Redefining the Professional in Professional Ethics` Law and Contemporary Problems, vol. 58 nos. 3 and 4, pp 241-258.

 

http://scholarship.law.duke.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4297&context=lcp

 

What does `being a professional` mean to you?

 

 

21

Lecture 21

Reflections on progress

 

Bring Learning Log and Assignment 2 specific questions to discuss.

Read:

 

http://infed.org/mobi/donald-schon-learning-reflection-change/

 

 

22

Lecture 22

Learning Logs

Formative assessment

Review and completion

 

 

Bring Learning Log and Assignment 2 specific questions to discuss.

 

 

 

 

  

23

Lecture 23

Assessment advice and support

 

 

 

Individual support

 

 

 

24

Lecture 24

Assessment advice and support

 

Task: On Moodle review your experience of ED4006.

25

 

Revision classes and study skills for Study Fest

Sessions to be announced

26

Revision classes and study skills

 

 


 

 

ASSESSMENT

 

 

How the Learning outcomes are assessed

 

 

 

Module learning outcome

 

Assessment criteria

 

The student can:

 

1

Apply a range of theoretical perspectives in relation to philosophy of education

 

Use and define a variety of philosophical terms in their academic writing.

2

Identify and evaluate key philosophical issues in education

 

Contextualise their academic writing with reference to key philosophical theories of education.

3

Describe and analyse different and competing philosophical theories of education

 

Assess key philosophical theories

in their impact in class discussions and in academic writing.

4

Apply philosophy to an analysis of a variety of educational issues such as justice, equality, autonomy and meritocracy.

Appropriately use educational terminology in discussions and academic writing.

5

Use academic texts to inform thinking and practice.

Demonstrate good research skills in the range of sources used as evidence.

6

Demonstrate skills of information retrieval, handling and presentation in accordance with academic convention.

Reflect on a learning experience and assess its relevance.

7

Demonstrate knowledge of different concepts of professionalism in the context of education

Identify key ideas of professionalism in occupations related to teaching.

 

This table shows how these learning outcomes relate to the assessment tasks of this module:

 

Task

Learning outcomes

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

British Library Visit Report

 

/

 

 

 

/

 

Learning Log

 

 

 

 

 

 

/

Essay Question

/

 

/

/

/

 

 

 

Assessment

 

ED4006 Assessment   2015-16 Assessment Requirements in Detail:

Formative Assessment:

Please note that you will be expected to submit work for formative assessment covering all Learning Outcomes.

 

 

 

 

Assignment 1 (40%)

Write a report (1,500 words) on your visit to the British Library and the workshop you will attend on Research Matters. The report will expect you to:

  • Explain what you think was the purpose of the visit
  • Discuss the key things you learned during the visit
  • Examine how you might apply what you have learnt to this module and your other modules.

 

NB Avoid giving a narrative and mainly factual account: the report must be reflective. You will be penalised for going more than 10% over, or more than 10% under, the word limit.  

 

(Covering Learning Outcomes 2 & 6- 1500 words +/-10%)

 

Submission Date:  Through Turnitin Tuesday the 13th of December 2016 before 3:00pm

 

Alternative Assignment 1

Assignment 1 (40%)

Submitted using the Turnitin Link by Tuesday 13th of   December 2016 by 3:00pm.

 

Write a report (1,500 words) on the key skills and approaches that philosophy provides to students of education:  

  • Refer to  examples of such skills and approaches as used by specific philosophers
  • Comment on whether philosophers agree on these approaches
  • Use relevant academic sources which are properly referenced.

You will be penalised for going more than 10% over, or more than 10% under, the word limit.  

Learning outcomes: 2 and 6

 

Assignment 2 (60%)

 

This assignment is comprised of two components: A Learning Log (20%) and a reflective essay (40%).

 

Learning Log (20%)


You will complete reflective comments for each Lecture topic in the module. You will receive formative feedback on the Learning Log at Week 5 and Week 17. You are assessed on the quality of your engagement and reflection. 

 

For keeping a complete log, with entries for each of the 24 weeks, you will receive 20% of the total marks. It must be complete to achieve 20%. A few words or merely simple factual comments for any entry will not be accepted as evidence of full engagement.  For further guidance, please see Moodle and related lecture and seminar content.

 

 

(Learning Outcome 7: 1,500 words minimum)

 

Submission Date: Through Turnit


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  • Title: 2016-17 ED4006 Philosophy Of Education
  • Price: £ 129
  • Post Date: 2018-11-06T10:32:19+00:00
  • Category: Assignment
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2016-17 ED4006 Philosophy Of Education 2016-17 ED4006 Philosophy Of Education
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